Book Review: Trials of Apollo- The Tyrant’s Tomb by Rick Riordan

Trials of Apollo- The Tyrant’s Tomb by Rick Riordan
Author: Rick Riordan
Publishers: Puffin Publishers
Rating: 4.5/5

Trials of Apollo: The Tyrant’s Tomb is the 4th book in the pentalogy series by Rick Riordan. Oscillating between fantasy, magic and mythological fiction, this series is well-suited for children and adults alike. Like the previous books in this series, this book is also a roller coaster ride and offers an amalgamation of crazy, amusing yet poignant moments.

With the passing away of Jason, one of the Demigods, in The Burning Maze, I assumed that nothing would be more difficult than that loss. However, I was at the loss of words when I learnt about the pathos that came along with Jason’s death. How beautifully does Riordan deal with grief and loss! Highlighting the importance of friendship, he crafts the characters of Hazel, Frank, Thalia and Reyna so well. Genuine emotions amidst a magical realm are difficult to set up. But Riordan’s powerful narrative passes the muster.

We know fairly well that Caligula and Commodus are the menacing enemies that cannot be crushed alone. Even though Apollo uses his strength and wit, he does rely on his friends to help him conquer the enemies. This paves way for the readers to be introduced to Apollo’s twin side- the more humane side. It is quite interesting to witness the change of heart in him.

I liked how, as an adult, I could read between the lines and understand that bullying or any form of evil doesn’t stay for long. The positive energy within our heart and mind has to be put together to quell the negativity. Apollo learnt this the hard way and so do most of us. Thus, this makes the book all the more relatable. Unlike the previous parts, this part did have a silver lining in the grey cloud in the end.

Even though I like the plot and the mystical world that Riordan sets up, I don’t quite appreciate the colloquial language used. One of the chief reasons for this is the fact that this book is for young kids who read to enjoy and learn the language as well. Secondly, at times I felt that there was dramatized representation of Greco-Roman culture that was sometimes factually incorrect.

Nevertheless, the book is action-packed and can be finished in a single sitting. Using humour at the right places, the author aces the test again with his epigrammatic writing style.

Best wishes to the author!

Buying link: Amazon

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